Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders

RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1--3

Bibliometric analysis of three-dimensional printing in spinal surgery


 
 Editorial Office of Chinese Journal of Tissue Engineering Research, Shenyang, Liaoning Province, China

Correspondence Address:

Abstract

Objective: To perform bibliometric analysis of studies on the developing trend of three-dimensional (3D) printing in spinal surgery using the Science Citation Index Expanded via the Web of Science. Methods: The key words were “3D printing, spine.” Web of Science data were retrieved for relevant studies published from 2010 to 2020. A total of 4181 studies were collected for visual analysis. Results and conclusion: From 2010 to 2020, 4181 studies concerning the application of 3D printing in spinal surgery were listed in the Web of Science database. The United States had the largest number of publications (1249 studies), accounting for 29.8% of the total. The institutions with many publications included University of California, University of Montreal, Harvard University, and Johns Hopkins University. The journals publishing the included studies were mainly devoted to spinal surgery. European Spine Journal had the largest number of articles (202), accounting for 4.8% of the total. In the past 10 years, the number of studies regarding the application of 3D printing to spinal surgery worldwide has risen at a slow rate. The studies on the application of 3D printing to spinal surgery have received generous funding, with the United States Department of Health and Human Services as the major source of funding.



How to cite this article:
. Bibliometric analysis of three-dimensional printing in spinal surgery.Clin Trials Orthop Disord 2020;5:1-3


How to cite this URL:
. Bibliometric analysis of three-dimensional printing in spinal surgery. Clin Trials Orthop Disord [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 May 30 ];5:1-3
Available from: http://www.clinicalto.com/text.asp?2020/5/1/1/281593


Full Text



 Introduction



Three-dimensional (3D) printing, known as “rapid prototyping technology,” can print 3D digital models of physical structures through the fusion of powdered adhesive materials such as plastic or metal using data from CT and MRI.[1] 3D printing is a kind of additive manufacturing, which can be realized through digital material printing.[1] 3D printing is playing an increasingly significant role in the field of medicine, and is widely used in spinal surgery, joint surgery, head and neck surgery, and plastic surgery.[2],[3],[4] The continuous development of 3D printing provides a new way for spine surgeons to understand and solve problems in disease diagnosis, preoperative planning and design, intraoperative navigation, doctor-patient communication, and clinical teaching.[5],[6] 3D printing can transform 3D data into an actual physical model using fusible materials, and display the images of complex lesions and anatomical structures for surgeons, thereby providing a basis for disease diagnosis, thus improving the success rate of surgery and reducing postoperative complications.[7],[8] This study collected data and analyzed the international development trend of 3D printing in spinal surgery.

 Data and Methods



Data source

Web of Science was used to find relevant studies published from 2010 to 2020. The key words were “3D printing, spine.” A total of 4181 studies were collected for analysis.

Inclusion criteria

Studies on the clinical application and clinical teaching of 3D printing in spinal surgery were included.

Exclusion criteria

Studies unrelated to inclusion criteria were excluded.

Literature type

Original articles, reviews, meeting abstracts, proceedings papers, editorials, book chapters, and letters were included.

Analysis methods

The bibliometric image analysis function of the Science Citation Index Expanded via the Web of Science database was combined with the drawing function of Microsoft Office Excel 2007 software (Microsoft, Inc., Redmond WA, USA). From the aspects of country, region, institution, study type, journal and time distribution, and foundation, the relevant studies on the application of 3D printing in spinal surgery were statistically analyzed.

 Results



Country distribution

The country distribution of studies addressing the application of 3D printing in spinal surgery indexed by Web of Science from 2010 to 2020 is displayed in [Figure 1].{Figure 1}

From 2010 to 2020, among the 4181 studies, the country with the largest number of publications was the United States (1249 studies, 29.8%), followed by China (567 studies, 13.6%), Germany (431 studies), Canada (361 studies), Japan (293 studies), France (249 studies), South Korea (232 studies), United Kingdom (214 studies), Switzerland (147 studies), and Italy (141 studies). This indicates that China is active in the application of 3D printing in spinal surgery.

Institution distribution

The top 10 institutions with the highest numbers of included studies were the University of California (104 studies), University of Montreal (97 studies), Harvard University (82 studies), Johns Hopkins University (76 studies), Centre National De La Recherche Scientifique (67 studies), University of Toronto (59 studies), University of Texas (53 studies), Assistance Publique Hopitaux Paris (52 studies), Yonsei University (50 studies), and Mayo Clinic (46 studies) [Table 1].{Table 1}

Types of literatures

The included studies were mainly original articles (3535 accounting for 84.5% of the total, followed by proceedings papers (457, 10.9%), reviews (174, 4.2%), meeting abstracts (40), editorials (19), letters (9), and book chapters (9) [Figure 2].{Figure 2}

Proceedings papers may also be original articles published by journals indexed by the Web of Science, which may have been counted twice here. Therefore, the total sum of all types of studies exceeds the total number of the included studies.

Source journals

Journals with the largest number of articles concerning the application of 3D printing in spinal surgery indexed by the Web of Science from 2010 to 2020 are listed in [Table 2].{Table 2}

The statistical analysis of the journals that published references can help researchers to understand the core publications where the references were published and master the application of 3D printing in spinal surgery. Tracking source journals can be used to guide researchers in selecting journals with related subject categories, and can improve the success rate of article submission. It is beneficial for the authors to expand their influence in this field when published research results.

Publication year

Publication year of studies concerning the application of 3D printing in spinal surgery indexed by Web of Science from 2010 to 2020 is exhibited in [Figure 3].{Figure 3}

Funding institutions

The institution that supports most included studies on the application of 3D printing in spinal surgery is United States Department of Health Human Services (274 studies, 6.6%), followed by National Institutes of Health NIH USA (266 studies, 6.4%), National Natural Science Foundation of China (186 studies, 4.5%), Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (119 studies, 2.9%), Ministry of Education Culture Sports Science and Technology Japan MEXT (67 studies), National Science Foundation NSF (61 studies), European Union EU (52 studies), Canadian Institutes of Health Research CIHR (50 studies), German Research Foundation DFG (48 studies), and Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (46 studies). Institutions that support the included studies are displayed in [Figure 4].{Figure 4}

 Discussion



Through the bibliometric analysis of the literature data on the application of 3D printing in spinal surgery, we can draw the following conclusions:

(1) The analysis of country distribution revealed that United States has the largest number of publications and plays an important role in this field. The analysis of institutions concluded that the institutions with many publications include University of California, University of Montreal, Harvard University, and Johns Hopkins University. These universities are the core institutions devoted to 3D printing in spine surgery. In recent years, the application of 3D printing technology in spine surgery has received more funding, with the United States Department of Health and Human Services funding the largest number of studies, followed by the National Institutes of Health.

(2) The literature indexed by the Web of Science shows that 3D printing in spinal surgery has had a steady upward trend in the distribution of countries and regions, institutions and source journals. The bibliometric analysis described the research trend in this field, which will provide valuable reference for researchers to be familiar with the hot topics in this field and select the best journals for submission.

(3) Three-dimensional printing has been extensively applied in clinical spinal surgery, and has developed rapidly as an aid to preoperative diagnosis, intraoperative navigation, doctor-patient communication, teaching, support production, built-in customization, and bone tissue engineering.[9],[10],[11] 3D printing has the advantages of high accuracy, repeatability and safety, can shorten operation time, improve the success rate of the operation, and reduce postoperative complications. It has been favored by spine surgeons and has gradually penetrated into all aspects of spinal surgery.[12],[13],[14] With the advent of the 3D printing technique, the introduction of engineering technology and elements, and the gains in materials science, it is believed that 3D printing will continue to progress and improve, and will be increasingly used in spinal surgery.

Data sharing statement

Data can be available at www.figshare.com.

Plagiarism check

Checked twice by iThenticate.

Peer review

Externally peer reviewed.

Open access statement

This is an open access journal, and articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as appropriate credit is given and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

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